Author Topic: “Blade” molle short bows  (Read 1825 times)

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Offline superdav95

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Re: “Blade” molle short bows
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2022, 01:17:12 am »
Great tips Ed.  I did up my lightning bolt tip overlays yesterday on my composite molle bow yesterday.  Here’s a sneak peek.   Thanks again. 

Cheers

Offline backtowood B2W

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Re: “Blade” molle short bows
« Reply #16 on: June 28, 2022, 03:16:52 pm »
 (-P

Offline superdav95

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Re: “Blade” molle short bows
« Reply #17 on: June 29, 2022, 12:16:50 am »
Update on my progress on these bows.  I decided to steam bend 2 of the bows and will leave one to do the v splice method.  There was a little lifting of end grain where the transitions occurs at the start of the blade tips but can fill in with some glue later if needed.  One bow I cut down the hiwght of the blade to keep to one ring thickness and will let dry overnight in the forms.  Here’s a few pics.

Thanks for following along. 


Dave.

Offline bownarra

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Re: “Blade” molle short bows
« Reply #18 on: June 29, 2022, 03:02:19 am »
Hide glue for very dry climates, fish bladder for more humid areas. It does make a difference 100%.
EA40 is stronger when mixed 2:1 and cured at 40 degrees.  Its heat resistance definitely goes up too. It will of course hold horn to a core...but I see it as a bit of a cop out when making a hornbow - I like them to be traditional - to each his own. Importantly the bond between horn and core is one of the last to be affected by rain/humidity. the sinew is the weak link with reference to humidity. Often the belly of hornbows wasn't even covered or finished - no need. The painting and leather covering are simply to protect the back (and maybe the edges a little).
I still think the issues with these bows will be stack.
You mention adding a little more reflex. If you don't pull the tips together when adding layers after gelling, before any drying takes place you risk the sinew delaming. Personally if I made this sort of bow I would want the tips touching.  The horn and sinew can take it easily. String tension at brace is one of the main reasons hornbows shine. You can't have too much reflex!
Good luck.

Offline superdav95

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Re: “Blade” molle short bows
« Reply #19 on: June 29, 2022, 08:09:05 am »
Hide glue for very dry climates, fish bladder for more humid areas. It does make a difference 100%.
EA40 is stronger when mixed 2:1 and cured at 40 degrees.  Its heat resistance definitely goes up too. It will of course hold horn to a core...but I see it as a bit of a cop out when making a hornbow - I like them to be traditional - to each his own. Importantly the bond between horn and core is one of the last to be affected by rain/humidity. the sinew is the weak link with reference to humidity. Often the belly of hornbows wasn't even covered or finished - no need. The painting and leather covering are simply to protect the back (and maybe the edges a little).
I still think the issues with these bows will be stack.
You mention adding a little more reflex. If you don't pull the tips together when adding layers after gelling, before any drying takes place you risk the sinew delaming. Personally if I made this sort of bow I would want the tips touching.  The horn and sinew can take it easily. String tension at brace is one of the main reasons hornbows shine. You can't have too much reflex!
Good luck.

Thanks for the info bownarra!   I’ll have to dig out some good pieces of horn for these ones.  I’ve noticed the humidity factor with the difference in hide or fish glue.  I do worry too about stack.  I may have to settle for shorter draw in the end.  Thanks again for the input