Author Topic: Knappable Rock Resource Page...  (Read 59041 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Mike_H

  • Member
  • Posts: 323
Re: CHECK THIS OUT...
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2013, 01:45:33 pm »
Yeah, an image of each type of rock and general formation distribution map would be great and extremely helpful as there were only two stones foe Maine I have heard of.

Offline JackCrafty

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 5,450
  • Sorry Officer, I was just gathering "materials".
Re: CHECK THIS OUT...
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2013, 06:57:28 pm »
Russ, your idea is a good one.  And I certainly agree that a list of knappable rock types, where the rock formations are located, and a picture would be very useful.

It's a big project, but I guess I'll start with Maine.  Right now I'm also researching lithic technology terms, definitions, and theories but the two areas (lithic quarries and lithic technology) often overlap.

Here's what I've got so far from Maine.

From the list posted here:

Cow Head Chert
The name comes from a Native American stone tool kit called the "Cow Head Complex".  The tools from this kit (includes arrowheads) can be found in Newfoundland, Labrador, and Quebec. The vast majority of these tools are made from rhyolite, not chert.  There is no such thing as "cow head chert" in Maine.

Kineo Felsite or Kineo Rhyolite
From wikipedia:  Native Americans once traveled great distances to Mt. Kineo (beside Moosehead Lake) to acquire its rhyolite rock. The mountain is a peculiar geological formation of flint known as siliceous slate, or hornstone. It is the country's largest known mass of this rock, once used by Indians to craft arrowheads, hatchets, chisels, etc. Because Indian implements made from the stone have been found in all parts of New England and even further south, it is evident that various tribes visited Mt. Kineo for centuries to obtain this material.

Some guys over on paleoplanet have made points from this: ---http://paleoplanet69529.yuku.com/topic/37452#.US0lqRm0IZ0
Also some info here:  ---http://www.fishermensvoice.com/archives/0510KineoFlint.html

Munsungun Lake Chert
Also Munsungan Lake  ---http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440398903351

North Hood Chert
???  Could not find a legit reference to this chert.

Ramah Chert
Found in Labrador, Canada.  Not found in Maine.  Very limited quantities.
There are only two known sources of high quality, flakeable chert along the entire Labrador coast. One is in the Cape Mugford region, the other is farther north in the area of Ramah Bay. This second source is found in an extremely limited area, as part of a sedimentary formation that runs from Saglek Bay north through Ramah Bay, ending at Nachvak Fiord.  ---http://www.heritage.nf.ca/environment/landscape_ramah.html

Vermont Jasper
Also called Maroon Vermont Jasper
---http://www.mpbn.net/quest/info-chert.shtml

Some other possible knappable rhyolite in Maine:

Lobster Mountain
Much of Lobster Mountain on the west side of the lake and Big Island is underlain by a variety of volcanic rocks collectively called the Lobster Mountain volcanics. These are all Ordovician in age and probably represent volcanic islands created when part of the oceanic crust was subducted. Lobster Mountain itself is underlain by a light greenish gray rhyodacite: an otherwise very fine-grained rock with large angular crystals of quartz. It weathers a distinctive light gray and is well exposed on the trail to the summit that begins at Jackson Cove.

Traveler Rhyolite
Much of the northern part of Baxter State Park is underlain with rhyolite, a light-colored volcanic rock that is similar in composition to granite, in this case the Katahdin granite, but that is much finer grained. In many outcrops the grains are too fine to see with the naked eye. Most of the peaks (The Traveler, North Traveler, Black Cat Mountain), the cliffs around Upper and Lower South Branch Ponds, and the mountains you passed on the way into the park (Horse Mountain) are underlain with this rock. Most of the unit formed from large eruptions of volcanic ash rather than by flows of molten magma. The Traveler Rhyolite is probably 3,200 meters thick and tilts northward at a moderate angle. In a close up of the Traveler Rhyolite, the dark streaks in the rock are flattened pieces of pumice that formed as a rain of volcanic bombs that accompanied the ash eruption.

Vinalhaven Rhyolite
The geology of the northern part of Vinalhaven, from Middle Mountain to Browns Head, is less famous than the Vinalhaven granite but in some ways more interesting. A variety of volcanic rocks give clues to an ancient past when this part of the earth's crust was being formed. Collectively, these rocks have been named the Vinalhaven Rhyolite, after the most common type of volcanic rock there.

Knappable stone from New Hampshire imported into Maine in ancient times:

Banded Spherulitic Rhyolite
Also might be called Mount Jasper Rhyolite, Jefferson, NH

Artifacts of spherulitic rhyolite derived from two locations in northern New Hampshire are significant to minor components of numerous Paleoindian, Archaic and Woodland archaeological sites in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Vermont and easternmost Quebec. The two known sources of are a dike near the city of Berlin, New Hampshire, and blocks-in-till near the village of Jefferson, New Hampshire.

---http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440307001094
---http://tommclaughlin.blogspot.com/2011/09/exploring-ancient-cave.html

See below for pics of Banded Spherulitic Rhyolite.

« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 01:39:38 am by jackcrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline JackCrafty

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 5,450
  • Sorry Officer, I was just gathering "materials".
Re: CHECK THIS OUT...
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2013, 06:59:12 pm »
 :)
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline Mike_H

  • Member
  • Posts: 323
Re: CHECK THIS OUT...
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2013, 09:30:22 pm »
Thanks Pat.  I emailed the list to a local knapper Dick Doyle Jr.  Some of you may know hin.  He let me know where most of those on the list are from.  You just happen to have given me some possibilities.

Offline JackCrafty

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 5,450
  • Sorry Officer, I was just gathering "materials".
Re: CHECK THIS OUT...
« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2013, 09:52:36 pm »
If Dick Doyle told you where most of the flint on the list is from, don't be shy.  Let us know!!  General area is fine.  And what the heck is North Hood Chert?
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline AncientArcher76

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,113
Re: CHECK THIS OUT...
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2013, 01:59:07 am »
That is some cool looking stuff Patrick...Hey Pat would u really go that far north for rock???

Russ
Time, dedication, cuts, tons of broken rock, a wife, and perhaps a few girlfriends are some of what it takes in becoming a skilled flint knapper!!!
 
"Ancient Art"  by R. Hill

Offline Hunts with stone

  • Member
  • Posts: 285
Re: Knappable Rock Resource Page...
« Reply #21 on: February 27, 2013, 08:46:23 am »
This is a big Project for sure. I started looking at google earth map overlay's but can't seem to get it worked out. But you can get the Formation and overlay them with roadmaps on google earth. There are References to this on Paleo planet Resource area.

Offline Dalton Knapper

  • Member
  • Posts: 339
Lithic Sourcing
« Reply #22 on: February 27, 2013, 10:54:06 am »
I looked over the list and it appears to pretty much word for word be that of the Lithic Sourcing web page. It's a site for archeologists to use for rock identification.

Here's that site: ---http://www.lithicsourcing.com/index.htm]http://www.lithicsourcing.com/index.htm

Lithic Sourcing claims that, "This site should be considered a work in progress and will become more useful as more precise information and detailed photographs become available." There is a contact address at the bottom of the page and I would suspect that Ms. Angelo might be interested in making her information more accurate and complete. Looks like it was last updated in Dec. 2012.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 12:22:45 pm by jackcrafty »

Offline JackCrafty

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 5,450
  • Sorry Officer, I was just gathering "materials".
Re: Knappable Rock Resource Page...
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2013, 01:37:22 am »
Yep, the same list is on the lithicsourcing site.

And, no, I would not go that far north for rocks.  I'd march myself into walmart and get a bunch of Riesling wine bottles before I did that! :P
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline Mike_H

  • Member
  • Posts: 323
Re: CHECK THIS OUT...
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2013, 09:52:06 am »
If Dick Doyle told you where most of the flint on the list is from, don't be shy.  Let us know!!  General area is fine.  And what the heck is North Hood Chert?

He's never head of it unfortunately.  Could be mislabeled, he used Fort Hood chert.  Most of that listed is probably found artifacts and not local stone deposits.  The only two that are indeed native to Maine are Mussungan Chert and Kineo Rhyolite.

" Mount Jasper in just over the border in New Hampshire. The new ones are Cow Head chert which is from Newfoundland, Ca, and Ramah chert originates from northern Labrador, Ca. Vermont jasper is kind of a misnomer in that it's not very knappable. Never heard of North Hood Chert, Fort hood is quite nice to work, however."  From the email he sent me.  hope he doesn't mind.

Offline Mike_H

  • Member
  • Posts: 323
Re: Knappable Rock Resource Page...
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2013, 11:42:15 am »
Just wanted to add that there will be an exhibit during the University of Southern Maine Knap-in of knappable lithics of New England.  I will try to get pictures of it when I'm there.  And if you are lucky enough to come visit, check it out yourselves.

Offline outback118

  • Member
  • Posts: 18
Re: Knappable Rock Resource Page...
« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2013, 10:39:01 pm »
one link I have found usefull is ---http://www.mindat.org/]http://www.mindat.org/. You can search for the rock of your choice and will give some hints were to look for it. I first found it looking for gold deposits to prospect.

thats all you will get from me. Rock hounds gard thier honny wholes better than fishermen do.

« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 12:23:05 pm by jackcrafty »

Offline AncientArcher76

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,113
Re: Knappable Rock Resource Page...
« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2013, 12:20:27 pm »
great work so far.  Hey Bob thank for the info.  I would like foe you to give me a call gotta ask you something.  Listen guys my real reason for this project was to give ideas to people most people don't know that there are such a wide variety of Knapp able rock out there and if they knew there was a potential for discovering a new source then great.  Believe me when I tell u we will never run out of flint and if we find new sources then we won't deplete one particular source...good work so far.

Russ
Time, dedication, cuts, tons of broken rock, a wife, and perhaps a few girlfriends are some of what it takes in becoming a skilled flint knapper!!!
 
"Ancient Art"  by R. Hill

Offline JackCrafty

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 5,450
  • Sorry Officer, I was just gathering "materials".
Re: Knappable Rock Resource Page...
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2013, 12:00:48 am »
The guys over on paleoplanet have have a thread on this too.  Just thought I would post a link to it:

---http://paleoplanet69529.yuku.com/forums/17#.UYhnGYLrkZ0
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 12:23:14 pm by jackcrafty »
Any critter tastes good with enough butter on it. :::.

Patrick Blank
Midland, Texas
JackCrafty (youtube)

Where's the Rock?  Public Waterways, Road Cuts, Landscape Supply, Knap-Ins.
How Do I Cook It?  Light Colors:  200  for 24hrs, 400  for 4hrs, Cool for 12hrs.

Offline AncientArcher76

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,113
Re: Knappable Rock Resource Page...
« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2013, 11:51:32 am »
Maybe we can put this up on top for a reference page like it was intended for.  It may be crude but as people add to it maybe after a certain period of time we can clean up the page if needed.  My intentions of creating this page was to teach people who are interested in learning their states Knapp able rocks, rock formations, and everything in between.  This is an important part in the stone tool making.

Russ
Time, dedication, cuts, tons of broken rock, a wife, and perhaps a few girlfriends are some of what it takes in becoming a skilled flint knapper!!!
 
"Ancient Art"  by R. Hill