Author Topic: Appalachian Archer  (Read 7077 times)

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blackhawk

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2015, 04:37:37 pm »
Saw it on fb too....thought it was cool.

So if i was a confederate vet n couldnt have my firearms id prob be pissed off and wanting to kill something...so id grab the next best thing and grab a bow and kill me sum critters ... ;)

I bet he turned the shoe upside down for kicks n giggles....when they took a pic back then it was all set up precisely the way they wanted it to be. They werent running around takin pics like we do nowadays

Offline Able Arrow

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2015, 05:26:46 pm »
Very cool pic. Thanks for sharing. I wish I knew more about it as well.


Offline Hrothgar

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2015, 09:39:25 pm »
PatM,
    I live in Missouri and I have to get my river cane from Texas. Regardless, the reference to southern states was meant to help identify what section of the Appalachian mountain range--Smokies, Blue Ridge, Quebec, Newfoundland, etc.
" To be, or not to be"...decisions, decisions, decisions.

Offline PatM

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2015, 10:25:52 pm »
You consider Quebec and Newfoundland Southern States? ;) River Cane really does or did grow much farther to the North despite you needing to source it elsewhere today. A lot of it has been eradicated.

 BTW the  Appalachians do not extend into Quebec.

riverrat

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2015, 03:32:51 am »
looks like nodes on bottom arrow. look at the fletches.look at about the same distance as the fletch is long. node. another node between his hand and sinew wrap.those are river cane arrows.Tony

Offline GlisGlis

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2015, 05:38:45 am »
if you got the original you may want to post a bigger resolution image
I'd like to see it and that will trigger new speculation for sure  >:D !

Offline Pappy

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2015, 06:10:14 am »
No idea but cool picture, bet he was a tough old buzzard. :)
 Pappy
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blackhawk

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2015, 06:51:42 am »
I have heard of river cane used to being here in Pennsylvania...but i dont think this chap was this far north tho. Looks more southern appalchia to me.

blackhawk

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #23 on: November 20, 2015, 06:55:17 am »
.... I would have loved to know that guy.

You can...just head to the hills jimmy and youll find quite a few that prob look and act just like him. Not much has changed in some of them rural appalachia areas. At first i thought it was a pic of my father in law from west by god. Lol  :laugh:

Offline Hrothgar

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #24 on: November 20, 2015, 07:16:22 am »
Pat, you need to start over, I never said Newfoundland is a southern state; I did say knowing what part of the Appalachian chain this guy occupied might help identify the type and materials of bow and arrows this man was using; and yes the Appalachian chain does extend into Canada, Labrador and Newfoundland.
" To be, or not to be"...decisions, decisions, decisions.

Offline PatM

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2015, 07:50:53 am »
Pat, you need to start over, I never said Newfoundland is a southern state; I did say knowing what part of the Appalachian chain this guy occupied might help identify the type and materials of bow and arrows this man was using; and yes the Appalachian chain does extend into Canada, Labrador and Newfoundland.

   I was just kidding that those two are not States at all. I know the Appalachians extend into Canada, but not Quebec.
 My point was that the pic could possibly be from a more northern state, even with the river cane arrows. Especially back in the day.
   The skins on the wall might give hints. Name them all and see where those animals range. That long tailed one on the left for example. What is that?

Offline PatM

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2015, 08:44:02 am »
 A little more info on the types of "river cane". Closer examination reveals a few more species.
"River cane and its cousin, switch cane (Arundinaria tecta, a smaller species), were until recently thought to be the only native North American arundinaria. There are hundreds of species native to Asia. Last winter, though, botanists from the universities of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Iowa State announced the discovery of a third species, which they call “hill cane” (Arundinaria appalachiana). It lives only in the southern Appalachians. Hill cane, unlike the other two North American species, is deciduous. It is much smaller and more closely resembles the grass family of which the canes are a part.

Researchers have published photos of the new species in Polk County, Tenn., and Macon County, N.C., but the species is much more widespread than that. Perhaps it has just been overlooked in the forests of the Southern mountains.
- See more at: http://www.smliv.com/features/river-cane-of-the-southern-appalachians/#sthash.ODKEU3Vt.dpuf

Offline George Tsoukalas

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Re: Appalachian Archer
« Reply #27 on: November 20, 2015, 08:59:13 am »
I spent my early years building houses and hen houses with my father.

The shingles look totally out of place. They are pipe straight and seem manufactured which looks out of character for that building and that picture.

Perhaps someone needed a new roof and bought the shingles which may play a role in dating.

The bow seems perfectly tillered. It is a great picture.

Very intriguing.

I grew up in a house that was built in the 1700's. So looking at the style of construction is not always accurate in aging a structure.

Jawge
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If you ain't breakin' you ain't makin!