Author Topic: Trade Gun Project  (Read 8131 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Trade Gun Project
« on: July 15, 2018, 11:06:30 am »
This .62 smoothbore kit will be a next step for me having completed a Lyman Plains kit previously.  I’d like to think that the next will be a submersion into inletting but I’m excited about this assembly.  I’ll need advice further along with any helpful insight into soldering the underlugs, pinning the barrel, drilling the touch hole, and whatever else need be.  I picked up the book which is great and packed with examples and information.  I’m in no rush...looking forward to learning a bit more.

I’ll be progressing and posting pictures.

So...I’m open to advice.  Where would you begin?
1’—>1’

Offline Pat B

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 33047
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2018, 01:24:45 pm »
Looks like a fun project, Steve. Looking forward to watching your progress.   :OK   :-M
Make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes!    Pat Brennan  Brevard, NC

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3522
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2018, 02:10:34 pm »
Put the barrel in place, mark where the touch hole should be, put your lock in as close to the existing inlet as possible and see if the pan centers your touch hole and is at the sunset position.

You may have to move your barrel back or down. You may have a little wiggle room on your lock position.

If it looks like your barrel is close the first step if to mate your barrel breech to the back of the the inlet. You want full breech contact before you inlet the breechplug, like in the picture.



« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 02:15:05 pm by Eric Krewson »

Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2018, 03:52:30 pm »
Thanks Mike and Eric.  Glad to see you guys post.  I’ll update when I progress.
1’—>1’

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3522
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2018, 06:14:40 am »
I don't see a touch hole liner in your parts, I recommend a white lightning liner from Jim Chambers, it is better than the TOW liner by the same name which is a bit different.

Here is a picture of a correct location for the liner in relation to the breechplug and barrel flat as well as the final location after the lock is in place, I shaded out the pan location with a sharpie. I am using a punch to put guide my drill bit into just the right location for the liner. I drill a small hole first and use it as a guide for the tap sized hole.



« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 11:40:44 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2018, 06:34:20 am »
I was thinking about that Eric.  I’ll take that advice.  I have tapped a couple things over the years...am I correct in thinking I’d be tapping the barrel myself?
1’—>1’

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3522
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2018, 01:17:36 pm »
I notched the breechplug on my first rifle because I drilled for the liner a little far back. One does compromise the breech plug to breech face seal when you notch the plug. I spent hours on my the rest of my guns getting a perfect breechplug seal and properly indexed to align the flats, not one of my better skills. All my guns go off very quickly.

If your barrel is a Colerain I can just about guarantee the breech plug isn't properly fitted to the breech even though it has an index mark that says it is. I have breeched two colerain barrels and one needed a little work and the other was two flats off the breech.

You will have to drill and tap for your liner and counter sink the hole slightly on the outside. Chambers liners are an oddball thread, you can buy the installation kit consisting of a correct drill bit and tap or you can buy the same stuff off ebay for 1/3 the cost.  After you get the liner in you will have to file off all the metal flashing and any of the liner that protrudes into the barrel. On a thick barrel the liner won't to into the bore. I see how much protrudes, remove the liner and grind off a little on the end to keep it flush with the bore. I do this before I cut off the bulb on the outside end of the liner and file it flush with the barrel flat.

Here is a finished liner installation, it should fit completely flush with the barrel flat.

 


Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2018, 04:53:12 pm »
I’ve been putting some time in.  The barrel is getting close to being flush with the inlet back.  A bit more work.  I’m going slowly.  I also installed the breach plug to a tight fit.  You can see the tang inletting is already done on the stock.  The tang itself is much longer, so I’ll have to cut and file it into place. 
1’—>1’

Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2018, 04:57:31 pm »
Another picture...
1’—>1’

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3522
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2018, 03:59:55 am »
NO, NO, don't file the tang to fit the inlet. The inlet is too small and the tang should be full length and width.

Before you go further, zip over to Track of The Wolf's site and buy their full sized plans for a trade gun. These plans are very good on pointing out how stuff should be shaped. The best $8 you ever spend if you are unsure about a build.

https://www.trackofthewolf.com/Categories/PartDetail.aspx/327/1/PLAN-NW

Here is my trade gun tang, this is an old Gustomsky kit from the 70s that a dying friend gave me. The tang is correct.

« Last Edit: July 29, 2018, 04:10:12 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2018, 05:48:22 am »
Hmm, ok.  The plans are a good idea.  I’ll do that.  Looking at the examples of historical trade guns there appears to be a field a variance in design.  From what I read in the text, they were known for this.  Here are some image examples, also, the tang I have.  Seeing that, what are your thoughts Eric?
1’—>1’

Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2018, 05:49:07 am »
And...
1’—>1’

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3522
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2018, 06:58:22 am »
You are right about the variance in tang shapes, but I would go with one that is visually appealing. The short stubby ones don't look very good and have the bolt coming in from the top. Mine is a Hudson Bay type and the tang bolt comes in from the bottom.

Did you do the carving around the tang or was it part of the precarve?

Your tang is much too long, you are right you need to trim it a bit.

Go over to the American Longrifle site, post a picture of your inlet and tang in the gun building section and ask what would be appropriate for your gun. These guys know their stuff, if you ask for pictures of their trade rifles tangs they will be glad to help you out.

I will ask the question for you if you like.

Offline Parnell

  • Member
  • Posts: 4895
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2018, 03:12:59 pm »
Barrel is almost flush, little more work.  Eric, Please have a look at the pencil marks.  Most tangs from historical guns are 2”, which is measured.  The precarve is clearly wider on the lock side.  Any thought on that...bring it even?
1’—>1’

Offline Eric Krewson

  • Member
  • Posts: 3522
Re: Trade Gun Project
« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2018, 06:50:35 pm »
The last precarve I put together was grossly wide on the lock plate side and very skinny on the lock side, so skinny I didn't know if I had enough wood to finish the gun. I was able to even things out by making a very slender gun which was a good thing.

You should be able to even out both sides out, it is part of the process with precarves.