Author Topic: BooYew  (Read 1346 times)

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Offline DC

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #30 on: May 15, 2019, 02:01:32 pm »
I think it's been done with backed, I'm not so sure about a selfbow. I can only pull about 40# so that's why I chose that. Then I can use the bow. 28" just seems to be a standard that everyone can relate to.
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Offline Bayou Ben

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #31 on: May 15, 2019, 02:52:30 pm »
Ah, yes, I forgot about your jig. 
I always thought about cutting at an angle like that but never did.  Just sanded until it fit right and snug down on the clamps.  Your method seems better. 
So have you tried a triangle piece to fit between deflexed limbs, then add riser parts (like Marc does)?  Just wondering what's your thoughts on the subject....
No, I've never tried that, I didn't realise that's how he did it. It does look like splicing the thinner pieces first may make it easier to get a nice splice but then it would be tougher to fit the riser piece. I have some thin OS drying, I'll try this method on that next year. If the OS has dried by then ;D ;D Is the picture one of yours or one of Marc's?

Yeah that's mine.  Just giving credit to Marc for the idea. 

It's nice to cut the exact angle you want for deflex into the triangle and glue up the splice and triangle at once. 
But cutting the splice at an angle would be an improvement for me.

Offline DC

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #32 on: May 15, 2019, 03:28:08 pm »
I find it's easier to glue a rectangular block in between the limbs and then cut the angle after. Like in the link I posted. I have a tough time clamping angled pieces, they tend to slide around. Gluing the block in between is quicker and easier. If you measure right, when you cut the diagonal the angle is done.
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Offline Bayou Ben

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2019, 04:14:07 pm »
I find it's easier to glue a rectangular block in between the limbs and then cut the angle after. Like in the link I posted. I have a tough time clamping angled pieces, they tend to slide around. Gluing the block in between is quicker and easier. If you measure right, when you cut the diagonal the angle is done.

I'm now understanding what you are doing.  That's a great idea.  I guess the tricky part is measuring and cutting the diagonal accurately. 

Offline DC

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2019, 05:08:49 pm »
It's not tricky, just make sure it's thicker than you need and make two cuts, well three. ;) ;)

Oh, make sure the limbs are oriented right. I glued the block to the back of one. :-[ :-[
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Offline DC

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #35 on: May 17, 2019, 04:01:55 pm »
Ah, yes, I forgot about your jig. 
I always thought about cutting at an angle like that but never did.  Just sanded until it fit right and snug down on the clamps.  Your method seems better. 
So have you tried a triangle piece to fit between deflexed limbs, then add riser parts (like Marc does)?  Just wondering what's your thoughts on the subject....

Ben, I've been looking at this picture. It looks to me like you've spliced together two 1/2"(about) pieces and then glued in the triangle piece. If so, have you had any problem with the riser lifting? If I did it this way I could get a few more bows for my buck.
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Offline Marc St Louis

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #36 on: May 17, 2019, 04:15:33 pm »
That's another nice one Don. Sorry I can't comment more on it but I'm not home right now and I find it hell to post with these hand held devices
Home of heat-treating, Corbeil, On.  Canada

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Offline Bayou Ben

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #37 on: May 18, 2019, 08:54:00 am »
Yeah thatís pretty much it DC.  Iíve done a couple this way and havenít had any problems. 
On this one I added a power lam and a thin piece to cover the triangle and limb connection.  Then I added more thin pieces on the top. 
If you do it this way I would suggest having your power lam go past your handle.  It will reduce some of the stress on the joint between the riser and limbs.

Offline DC

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #38 on: May 18, 2019, 09:29:16 am »
Thanks Ben. If I make the power lam that long I don't think it would be legal for the Primitive Simple Composite Bow class. Maybe a one piece backing would be better.
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Offline Woodely

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #39 on: May 18, 2019, 09:31:14 am »
What is Primitive Simple Composite Bow class.
"Doing bad work is an exercise in futility, but honestly making mistakes is trying your best."

Offline DC

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Re: BooYew
« Reply #40 on: May 18, 2019, 09:52:06 am »
What is Primitive Simple Composite Bow class.
Down toward the bottom. There is a thread in the "Flight Bow" forum.

https://usflightarchery.com/pdf/02_USAA-2017-Update-Flight%20Equipment.pdf
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