Author Topic: Curve in grain  (Read 1018 times)

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Offline IrishJay

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #15 on: November 29, 2019, 11:10:22 am »
Placing the tips agsinst the wall and then measuring from the wall to the back at center stave I have 5 7/8" reflex right now.

"The best camouflage pattern is called, 'Sit down and be quiet!' Your grandpa hunted deer in a red plaid coat, think about that for a second." - Fred Bear

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2019, 12:05:13 pm »
+1. DC.
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Offline IrishJay

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #17 on: November 30, 2019, 12:24:06 pm »
Well I think yinz guys talked me into it. I'm going to cleanup the rough-out/floor tiller, give it a nice deep slow heat treat, and tiller as is. Going for 50~55#@31". If it holds a fair amount of this flex it should be a real rocket launcher.
"The best camouflage pattern is called, 'Sit down and be quiet!' Your grandpa hunted deer in a red plaid coat, think about that for a second." - Fred Bear

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2019, 12:45:16 pm »
I love starting with that type of natural backset. The keys will be keeping it together and minimizing any set. Perfect tiller from the get go, floor tiller and beyond. Any weak spots will show up early. Prevent them.
Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum.  Distinctly American Values.

Offline IrishJay

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2019, 01:53:02 pm »
I'll let you know how its going once I get it bending. Right now it takes about 50# to push each limb straight against a floor scale, so I've got plenty of meat to work with.
"The best camouflage pattern is called, 'Sit down and be quiet!' Your grandpa hunted deer in a red plaid coat, think about that for a second." - Fred Bear

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2019, 02:04:34 pm »
Others will differ with this, but I get a string on them now, or soon anyway. 0 brace height. I work it out from there pulling an inch or two and check the tiller. Lots of belly wood to shed so counter to what it might seem, this method helps me prevent set. I just keep pulling an inch at a time until it is braceable (invented word🙂). The brace should be near perfect before moving farther.
Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum.  Distinctly American Values.

Offline IrishJay

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2019, 02:35:13 pm »
At this point I generally conservatively scrape just enough to even everything up and smooth out any marks left from rough out. Then move to the tree with a long string, long enough that it hangs slack from the bow. Then I tiller to weight and length with that long string. At that point I can usually get a nive even low brace.
"The best camouflage pattern is called, 'Sit down and be quiet!' Your grandpa hunted deer in a red plaid coat, think about that for a second." - Fred Bear

Offline SLIMBOB

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2019, 02:49:27 pm »
That is exactly what I did for a long time. I now work it a bit differently. With that much reflex I will use a long string, but only until I can get a tight string on it. 0 inches. Then just keep tightening the string as you get the tiller adjusted and you are at near full brace height. Food for thought.
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Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2019, 04:44:13 pm »
Don't let the reflex trick u,,,,might seem heavier than it is,..especially if some pulls out,.

Offline IrishJay

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Re: Curve in grain
« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2019, 05:27:13 pm »
The other bow that I'm just finishing up from this same wood, has surprisingly skinny limbs for it draw weight. Looking at the 2 side by side I'm confident that I have mpre than enough wood in this one to hit mid 50's
"The best camouflage pattern is called, 'Sit down and be quiet!' Your grandpa hunted deer in a red plaid coat, think about that for a second." - Fred Bear