Author Topic: The blight of feeders  (Read 5525 times)

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Offline bradsmith2010

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #30 on: December 10, 2019, 01:49:08 pm »
Pappy, I miss those white oaks in Tenn,,,, I sure did shoot at some deer there,, )P(
Chestnunt oak is good too,, if you find one,,

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #31 on: December 18, 2019, 08:12:00 am »
I went back and read some of the stuff in this thread, I apparently missed a few comments.

PD, the neighbor with the feeder is a new one, just moved in a year or so ago, he has a farm elsewhere. He and his wife moved in and brought two walker coonhounds with them. The dogs are incessant barkers and have a bark like a fog horn. They would often tree a squirrel and bark for 3 or 4 hours straight, an unbelievable disruption to our usually very quiet neighborhood.

The dogs might tree something at 4:00 in the morning or at at midnight, it was awful, about 5 barks a second between the two of them. After putting up with this nonsense for months I went over to introduce myself and asked for some help on the barking. The guy was a typical redneck, belligerent, defensive and took offence at my coming over. I softened him by being nice and telling him he could hunt my place and food plot any time he wanted to. I could tell by some ground blinds that were put up later that he did hunt on my land so I was offering him and opportunity to expand his hunting possibilities not stifling his.

He didn't have the feeder up when he was hunting my land, I am sure he saw all my deer movement when he hunted my place, then he put up a feeder on his place and quit hunting my land. He is not much of a hunter, his main pastime is sitting around a fire in his backyard, cranking up the country music to an annoying decibel level and downing tallboys.

These folk did admit they had a barking problem, as a former dog trainer I gave them an order blank for the best TriTronic bark collars and offered to pay for one one if they would buy the other. They turned down my offer but did order two collars themselves.

The world changed when the collars came in. All serious rednecks have a "get you back" gene, the guy kept the collars on during the night but turned them off when he went to work so he could get back at me for complaining, being away from home home he didn't have to listen to the racket. Being retired I still had to listen to hound music during the day but I could at least get a nights sleep. This get me back period went on for about 6 months, I didn't go over and complain and he finally left the collars on most of the time.

Before any of you take offense of my use of the term "redneck", let it be known that I am a former redneck ridge runner from the mountains of east tennessee where I grew up. Like they say "it takes one to know one". Fortunately as I aged and matured I moved on past the honky tonk lifestyle to be a more responsible, considerate type of person. 



« Last Edit: December 18, 2019, 08:25:24 am by Eric Krewson »

Offline Deerhunter21

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2019, 08:42:44 am »
jeeze...  >:(
"Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money." Cree Native-American Proverb

A amature practices untill he gets it right. A master practices untill he never gets it wrong.

Russell - 15 years

Offline PEARL DRUMS/PEARLY/PD/DRUMS

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2019, 10:23:55 am »
Boy, I guess that feeder wouldn't bother me much then, but dog barking does. I would call on him every day until the dogs are gone or the collars stay on 24/7. Some idiots really think that hunting hounds have to be allowed to bark all the time or they wont bark when they are supposed to. My buddy has a kennel full of black and tan beagles, has for years and years. They don't utter a bark until its hunting time. If by chance one pipes up he simply yells, "hey!" and they shut right up. It all starts as puppies.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize we cannot eat money.

Offline Bryce

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2019, 02:00:35 pm »
Boy, I guess that feeder wouldn't bother me much then, but dog barking does. I would call on him every day until the dogs are gone or the collars stay on 24/7. Some idiots really think that hunting hounds have to be allowed to bark all the time or they wont bark when they are supposed to. My buddy has a kennel full of black and tan beagles, has for years and years. They don't utter a bark until its hunting time. If by chance one pipes up he simply yells, "hey!" and they shut right up. It all starts as puppies.


Yep! I had 6 walkers and theyíre hush hush until they strike, then itís all over with.
Clatskanie, Oregon

Offline WhistlingBadger

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #35 on: December 18, 2019, 03:15:13 pm »
Nothing like dealing with really classy people. 
~Thomas
Wind River Country, Wyoming
Fall down six times.  Stand up seven.

Offline Hawkdancer

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #36 on: December 19, 2019, 12:29:55 am »
Them coon Hunter's is as crazy as loons and self bow folks!  I can keep up with a miniature dachshund, though!  Hope this is an exercise in a bit of tolerance, but I have been on both sides of the problem!  Wolfhounds will sing with the coyotes, even in town!  Never got to hunt with a beagle that could go into the brambles as well I could!  Had an excellent coon hunt on my first time out, we struck 4 hot tracks just after dark and were at the dance hall by 9:30! Got 4 coons!   Great evening!
Hawkdancer
Life is far too serious to be taken that way!
Jerry

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #37 on: December 19, 2019, 07:57:22 am »
I worked swing shift for 28 years and was a poor sleeper, all my dogs through the years were trained not to bark with a red ryder bb gun. A couple dogs took two shots to the butt from about 40 yards to learn what hush up meant, my last only needed one shot.

Most dogs are easy to train but there is a catch to success, you have to be smarter than the dog. That is why there are so many dogs out there that haven't been trained to do the simplest things, the dogs are smarter than the owners.

Offline ssrhythm

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #38 on: October 25, 2020, 08:18:49 pm »
Donít let it bother you.  It wonít take long before the deer know to hit that corn well after dark only.  My buddy puts it out to get pics and he will hunt there some too.  Iíve known him and hunted with him since 2008, and heís never shot a buck on a stand over or  coming to eat the corn.  I look for travel spots 1000 or more yards from any of his corn, and I have had more close opportunities hunting two weeks per year including skipping three years than heís had living and hunting there all season every season.  Old deer are rarely fooled by the big accord pile from what Iíve seen.

Offline Eric Krewson

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Re: The blight of feeders
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2020, 08:02:56 am »
The deer here have disappeared, bow season opened on the 15th, I suspect there are corn feeders humming in almost every backyard of the people in the neighborhood who hunt. I took down the electric fence around my food plot a week ago, last year the deer covered it up within a few hours after I took the fence down.This year not one deer has been feeding in it yet, I had one trail cam picture of a little 6 point walking across the plot but he didn't stop to feed.

I have the ground covered with white oak acorns behind my shop, every year in the past the deer would clean them up as fast as they fell. This year I put my trail cam facing the tree, in 4 or 5 days only one lonely doe walked by the tree, she didn't stop to pick up the first acorn.

They legalized hunting over feeders in Bama last year. If I kill one his year it will be corn fed and fat, perhaps this is a good thing. I live in a neighborhood where almost every house backs up against big woods. My property line backs up against about 200 acres of big hardwood timber, the deer are overpopulated but always wired, they will run from you if they see you 300 yards way.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2020, 08:07:28 am by Eric Krewson »