Author Topic: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine  (Read 638 times)

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Online IrishJay

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Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« on: December 07, 2018, 12:10:11 pm »
So, my first attempt at a bow failed while tillering. I did some digging around in my shop for what I was thinking was an old oak 1x10, once I found the board in question I checked the markings on it and it turns out I was mistaken is not oak, its Lodge Pole pine. Its marked as 1x10, but actual thickness is 3/4". I cut a 2" wide strip from it with ZERO KNOTS, and tapered it starting at the full 2" width 14" from the tips down to 5/8" at the tips.

Thoughts or suggestions?

Offline StickMark

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2018, 12:47:29 pm »
set it aside, and get a new board.   

Offline DC

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2018, 01:32:09 pm »
Although it has been done, Pine is not bow wood.
Vancouver Island
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Online IrishJay

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2018, 01:38:47 pm »
I'm going stave hunting tomorrow in a couple of areas that have alot of standing dead/leaners. The one area I'm going to hit definitely has some osage. After the break in the last bow I have a much better idea what to look for when picking staves so hopefully I can find some decent knot-free stuff. I'll be targeting oak, ash, and osage. Probably won't pass up hickory if I find a nice piece either.

Offline DC

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2018, 02:51:49 pm »
I would only take dead standing if it was Osage or maybe Yew. And then it would be a judgement call depending on how long it had been dead.
Vancouver Island
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Online bjrogg

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2018, 02:55:02 pm »
I agree with all the advice that you've been given
Bjrogg
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Online ty_in_ND

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2018, 04:27:53 pm »
I wouldn't pass on boards quite yet. Are you near any decently sized hardware/lumber stores? If you're patient enough, you can find some oak, hickory, or hard maple that'll work. Even if you do find some wood, it'll take some time to season. Why not take a crack at a $10-20 board!
"The best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing."

Offline loefflerchuck

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2018, 04:58:44 pm »
If it is clean old growth lodgepole I would give it another try. Sinew back it and make it wide. If I had it I would give it a try. Some Siberian bows were made from pine and spruce. They searched out compression wood.

Offline StickMark

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2018, 06:11:27 pm »
On second thought, ditto Chuck's idea on Siberian compression pine.  Somewhere out on the Google, there is a photo essay on Finns building a compression pine belly, birch backed bow.  Black and white photo essay.  Watching these men make a composite bow with hand tools mocks our modern problems. 

 Ordered some hide glue and sinew, finally.  I guess we eventually all try sinew, lol.

What I am saying, make a lighter weight bow.  You roughed it out.  Tiller it, pine is easy to rasp out.  Learn.

Offline George Tsoukalas

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2018, 03:02:21 am »
Jay, standing dead is no good unless it is black locust or osage. Lodge pole pine is good for arrows. Never heard it used for bows though Tim Baker says it is possible with special care.

A straight grained red oak board will do you well. Let it bend in the handle. Handle is the widest point. Backing it is good. Linen, silk and burlap will work. No glued on handles.

Info on my site. You can rip the board 1 3/8" to make it easier to shot.

http://traditionalarchery101.com/boardbowbuildalong.html

Jawge



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If you ain't breakin' you ain't makin!

Online IrishJay

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2018, 09:00:23 am »
Well if nothing else I'm getting alot of practice at cutting handles/riser blocks.

Offline George Tsoukalas

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2018, 12:40:27 pm »
Why do you need a glued on handle? Even if you were to do a handle bow shaping can be done after full draw.

A good first bow can be made from a red oak board that is 1 3/8" wide and bends in the handle, with no glued on handle?

Jawge
Set Happens!
If you ain't breakin' you ain't makin!

Offline loefflerchuck

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2018, 02:12:31 pm »
What's up with that grain shooting off the top of the back. Hope the bending section does not do that. I got a expensive doug fir board I'm starting on. Hope it makes a respectable bow. The growth rings in the wood are tiny. Like pages of a book. I have high hopes.

Online IrishJay

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2018, 05:45:55 am »
George, the glued on handles are just a matter of personal preference,  that's what I'm used to shooting with my recurve.

Offline willie

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Re: Pacific Pine/Lodge Pole Pine
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2018, 02:19:20 pm »
I got a expensive doug fir board I'm starting on. Hope it makes a respectable bow. The growth rings in the wood are tiny. Like pages of a book. I have high hopes.
:)  please keep us posted ,Chuck.
Irish,
 Georges suggestion about a bend in the handle is a good one for a pine bow. you will need as much bending as possible. I have used larch and fir also.
try to keep the bow about 2.5 times as long as the drew length you are shooting for. A war bow type design can be a sweet shooter, albeit in a more conventional poundage.
yes I agree that conifers are not the woods of choice for top performance, but sometimes its about the fun and experience gained,