Author Topic: Flight Arrows  (Read 1749 times)

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Offline DC

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Re: Flight Arrows
« Reply #45 on: October 26, 2020, 04:01:12 pm »
How about centershot? You mentioned Ivar's very light arrows and in a later post Alan said something about his centershot bow and his release aid. If you have an arrow that is low spine centershot isn't going to help the flight is it? I can kinda see a release helping. Maybe if this finger flipping the string is a bigger thing than I thought. Is it the butterfly flap that starts a hurricane ;D?

Offline avcase

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Re: Flight Arrows
« Reply #46 on: October 27, 2020, 12:16:57 pm »
Don,
Do give a release a try. I do prefer using a simple non-mechanical release, especially when shooting very light spine arrows.

I did have an interesting experience shooting Broadhead flight this last year. We are allowed to use a non-mechanical release with the modern recurve Broadhead event, so I shot three arrows with a finger release, and three arrows with a simple hook&loop release. I took my time drawing back with the back side of the Broadhead touching off on the back of the bow to set the draw length. I noticed the finger release arrows were kicking off to the side and I thought these shots were going to give terrible results. The arrows shot with a release appeared to leave the bow much cleaner without any side-to-side wag.  To my surprise, the longest shots were the arrows shot with the finger release! How this happened is a mystery to me.

I usually have opposite results where the arrows shot with the release do better, although this was usually with light flight arrows.

Alan

Offline DC

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Re: Flight Arrows
« Reply #47 on: October 27, 2020, 12:22:58 pm »
What is a hook and loop release? I googled it and what I got sure looks mechanical to me.


PS I found the pictures that Willie posted of what I think is hook and loop. With this and the number 9 releases do you have to rotate your hand 90į?
« Last Edit: October 27, 2020, 01:01:35 pm by DC »

Offline willie

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Re: Flight Arrows
« Reply #48 on: October 27, 2020, 01:28:53 pm »
I see some you rotate your hand and some you twist your hand and some you hold pressure with your thumb and then relax.


http://presleysoutdoors6.blogspot.com/2014/02/larry-wise-core-archery-academy.html
« Last Edit: October 27, 2020, 01:46:54 pm by willie »

Offline avcase

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Re: Flight Arrows
« Reply #49 on: October 27, 2020, 02:17:09 pm »
That was a pretty cool article on releases. The hook and loop release I referred to earlier is similar to the rope-spike releases shown near the beginning of the article. It takes a little practice at first, but quickly becomes so natural that it releases cleanly at full draw without little deliberate thought.  I remember handing one to a fellow flight archer the first time and it didnít release when he thought it should, so he completely let go of the release and the bow sent the release and arrow together down range!

I like the simple hook ones that let go with a slight rotation also.  The smaller you can make the hook, the cleaner it releases the arrow.

Alan

Offline DC

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Re: Flight Arrows
« Reply #50 on: October 27, 2020, 02:52:02 pm »
Well I may be stupid but looking at those pictures doesn't help me know how they work or how to use them. ;D Any videos? Not the ones in the article. I can see that they are holding something and that eventually the arrow disappears but that's all.
I did figure out how the figure 9 ones work. I made one once that was just a strap of leather that went around the string and you pinched the end of it. It worked well but when the leather flipped around the string it smacked my knuckle real hard. I only used it a few times and then screamed the safe word :D
The one with the string loop and the barely bent wire has me puzzled.