Author Topic: Life on the Farm  (Read 128857 times)

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Offline chamookman

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1140 on: May 04, 2024, 04:44:14 am »
Everything is looking good BJ!  (=) Bob.
"May the Gods give Us the strength to draw the string to the cheek, the arrow to the barb and loose the flying shaft, so long as life may last." Saxon Pope - 1923.

Offline Pappy

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1141 on: May 10, 2024, 08:21:37 am »
Looking good BJ, we had hail with the storms that moved through Tuesday and Wednesday that took out a lot of early gardens and some wheat crops. Sad but nature don't always do what we want it to.  :) I suspect most of the farmers had insurance, as for the gardens, they will just have to start over.
 Pappy
Clarksville,Tennessee
TwinOaks Bowhunters
Life is Good

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1142 on: May 12, 2024, 08:49:03 am »
Thanks Pappy. We generally donít get hail insurance on all our crops. Most of them will grow out of the damage depending upon what growth stage they are in. The most damaging timing is when certain crops are mature. Ripe wheat, soybeans and edible beans can literally be trashed in the field losing much of the grain we hope to harvest.


I donít think I have had as busy of a week as Pappy, but it was probably close.

I finished up planting my sonís corn. Then I put the second application of fertilizer on our wheat. We can get higher yield with less fertilizer if we split the application. We apply a little over half of it early and then we apply the second application just before the flag leaf comes out.

While I was working at that my brother and nephew switched planter to soybeans and got started planting them.

When I finished the wheat I traded My nephew off in the planter. Most of our soybeans are planted on headlands(the ends of the field where we turn around) and wedge rows. Itís a bit of a hassle planting, taking care of and harvesting them, but much easier than harvesting sugar beets from them in the fall. My nephew had planted the actual fields but I needed to plant the areas of the beet fields because I knew where the beets where and where the soybeans had to be planted.

The beets we planted last were up nice.

Bjrogg

A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1143 on: May 12, 2024, 09:09:14 am »
Then I put fertilizer on the sugar beets that didnít get biosolids over the winter. Again I split this application. I put a little more than half on now and I will come back again and put the rest on soon. Sugar beets need their fertilizer early so they grow tons. The object is to grow tons by mid August. We donít want to over fertilize. We want them to use up their fertilizer by mid August and then start to put their efforts into making sugar. If they have too much fertilizer left they will continue to grow tons and not concentrate on making sugar.

After I finished that I washed the sprayer. The fertilizer is very hard on steel and I want to wash it off as soon as I can.

Then I switched nozzles. The rye cover crop that we tilled and planted sugar beets into has done its job. Now it is like a weed and itís time to terminate it. I really love that we can plant into this rye . I think large sections of our fields would have been blown off by the wind if we were still planting into plowed ground. This is a case where old and new ways work so well together.

Hereís the sugar beet field and the rye that needs to be terminated. It will still provide great wind and soil erosion protection after itís terminated .

Bjrogg

A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1144 on: May 12, 2024, 09:20:45 am »
The timing was perfect. I finished up my work just before dark Friday night and by Saturday morning it was raining. Not hard but a nice although cool rain. That will really help to make the fertilizer I applied available to the crops and the rye wonít completely get away on us now.

Also it gave me a chance to relax just a little before our big night out.

My wife, son and a bunch of friends went to a concert at our local movie theater. Itís the second weíve been to and really enjoyed both. They have been doing about six concerts a year. Trying to keep the doors open on our old Community House Theater.

This time it was a Bob Seger cover band named Kat Mandu. Had a really good time. Totally worth the $35 ticket

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline Pappy

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1145 on: May 12, 2024, 06:57:03 pm »
Cool, love Bob Seger music, one of my favorite's , went to see him in Nashville a few years back and he still had it. :) :)
 Pappy
Clarksville,Tennessee
TwinOaks Bowhunters
Life is Good

Offline chamookman

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1146 on: May 13, 2024, 05:02:52 am »
Is the Theater You mention, the one in Harbor Beach? Went there many Years ago, when We got Stormed off the Lake and couldn't Fish. Glad to Hear the planting is going well.  (=) Bob
"May the Gods give Us the strength to draw the string to the cheek, the arrow to the barb and loose the flying shaft, so long as life may last." Saxon Pope - 1923.

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1147 on: May 13, 2024, 08:09:51 am »
Cool, love Bob Seger music, one of my favorite's , went to see him in Nashville a few years back and he still had it. :) :)
 Pappy

Bob sure puts everything into his music. I think Bob Seger and Joe Cocker are two off my favorite singers. Back in the early 80ís when he was really at his peak he would occasionally stop in at a small bar in Harbor Beach. I never got to meet him there but heard lots of stories. I was going to electronics school in Detroit at the time.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1148 on: May 13, 2024, 08:14:45 am »
Is the Theater You mention, the one in Harbor Beach? Went there many Years ago, when We got Stormed off the Lake and couldn't Fish. Glad to Hear the planting is going well.  (=) Bob

Yes Bob. Thatís the one. Itís actually more than just a theater. Itís our ď Community HouseĒ.
It has a theater, library and small gym. Pretty cool place

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1149 on: May 24, 2024, 08:40:21 am »
Been busy with family and farming.

Seems like it couldnít be possible, but my favorite granddaughter graduated from High School . Man that time went by fast.

Hope the big world treats her well. Sheís a fine young lady and we love her just the way she is. Sassy and sweet

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1150 on: May 24, 2024, 08:45:41 am »
Itís been a tough year for farming. We have been fortunate to get as much done as we have. We have been getting lots of rainy days, but fortunately we havenít had large amounts. Once again very spotty weather and many farmers are way behind.  We have for the most part stayed on schedule.

Our sugar beets, corn and soybeans came up good.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1151 on: May 24, 2024, 08:56:41 am »
The rainy days have given me the opportunity to do some gathering.
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1152 on: May 24, 2024, 09:02:17 am »
The cool rainy days have been putting disease pressure on the wheat.

Earlier in the year I had applied two different types of protectants to help prevent disease. Fungicides similar to a fungal soap you would use for yeast infections.

I know which one I wonít be using again. You can see the difference.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1153 on: May 24, 2024, 09:07:27 am »
The striped rust is completely taking over where the different protectant I tried was applied. I doesnít seem to have helped much if any.

The fungus infects the leaves and spreads rapidly in the conditions we have had this spring

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #1154 on: May 28, 2024, 03:47:04 pm »
Had a nice Memorial Day weekend.

Was missing the crew from Primitive Archery meet at Marshall, but spent it with family and friends.

Have had lots of rainy days lately and I felt like I needed to start a new project.

I just really got the bug to make a birch bark canoe.

I think I can gather everything from my farm

I started by gathering roots from spruce trees I planted in 1984. I spent a couple lunch breaks. Probably going to need a few more, but hereís the start of my canoe.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise