Author Topic: Life on the Farm  (Read 29709 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #60 on: February 16, 2022, 11:43:00 am »
Well now Iím getting somewhere. Turns out I had everything hooked up right but I didnít realize that the new harness for the individual rows electric eyes was wired for Deere now instead of Dickey John like it use to be. Dickey John switches the positive and negative their plugs. I had to remove the old adapter harnessís.

I powered everything up and it showed the rows. I also reprogrammed my precession display for 18 rows.

I then had everything except row 13 eye info. A few more calls to one of my buddies and a bunch of trouble shooting and I determined one of the new harness's has a open circuit.

The maker of the harness is going to call me.

Iím getting closer though and feeling much better than last night

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #61 on: February 18, 2022, 07:23:50 am »
I was hoping that the company that made the wire harness would just send me a new one and I would send the defective one back.

Thatís not how they wanted to do it though. They wanted me to do some more trouble shooting. I had already determined which harness was defective. Now they wanted me to remove the pins from the plugs to see if they had a simple problem with their crimp or a broken wire by the crimp. I have a tool to remove the pins and I pulled pin 13 out of one end and inspected it. It visually looked good. I still had open circuit between pins. I checked from pin to probing the wire just a inch or so from the crimped on pin. I had continuity there so that tells me the pin is crimped on properly.

Next I remove pin from plug on other end of harness. Once again I visually inspect it and it looks good. I check resistance between pins and circuit is still open. I check from pin to probing the wire a inch from the crimp and have continuity. Once again this is telling me the crimp is good. As unlikely as it seems, my new wire most have a break in it .

The technician Iím working with talks to his boss and they decide they want me to send this harness back so they can repair it and then send it back to me. Iím a little bummed as this is liking to take weeks. Iím really wanting to try everything out and see what other surprises I have. The harness is twice as long as I need. Iím very tempted to just cut it in half. See which half has good wire and wire plug on good half, but they donít want me to do that.

They decide to have Ups pick up my package. It sits in my shop another 24 hours waiting to get picked up.

In the meantime we work on the combine, but we are running out of new part and itís becoming a real problem getting them. Lots of stuff back ordered. Starting to get pretty nervous. We have most of our fertilizer on farm already in our storage tanks. Usually we have a lot of our chemicals on farm in in our storage to but this year we havenít been able to get any yet. In fact they still havenít been able to tell us what we will be able to get and have told us several things we wonít be able to get. Normally we have prepaid the majority of these inputs already. At this point we still canít because of this.

After everyone else goes home I decide to work on a project. Our ups guy quite often comes about 7:00 or 8:00 pm. The first night he doesnít show, but last night he did. He always likes seeing what Iím working on.

Itís a river cane shaft Iím straightening for a obsidian point I just finished. Guess I donít have a picture of the shaft, but hereís the point. I like this shape for arrows

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline chamookman

  • Member
  • Posts: 2,781
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #62 on: February 19, 2022, 03:33:28 am »
Great looking Point BJ ! Hope to be able to Finally meet You at the New location Memorial Weekend. I spend alot of time with that Bruce B. character  (lol) ! Bob
"May the Gods give Us the strength to draw the string to the cheek, the arrow to the barb and loose the flying shaft, so long as life may last." Saxon Pope - 1923.

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #63 on: February 19, 2022, 08:14:36 am »
Thanks Bob I really like Bruce and Cindy. They are really good people and made Susie and I feel right at home right from the first event we attended. We keep in contact. They even dropped by our shop a few years ago and dropped off two bear hides they decided to clean out of their freezer. I tanned one, but I havenít found the time to tan the second one yet. That was a lot more work than I thought it would be. Iíll get the second one  someday, but I can see itís not going to be this winter.

Bjrogg

A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #64 on: February 19, 2022, 08:45:55 am »
I was hoping to test all my systems out and find anymore surprises, but now I have to wait for the defective harness to be fixed and returned.

This is how our row starter fertilizer was applied. We never liked this system. Itís supposed to put the fertilizer 2Ē to the side of seed and 2Ē below the seed. It doesnít do a very good job of that. And weíve tried tweaking it, but still werenít satisfied.

Several years ago we tried mounting a knife behind one row like the second picture. It worked good, but the bracket we made was to light and bent. I could sure see that one row got off to a lot better start though.

We were going to try something on one row again, but since we have run out of parts we decided to go for broke and put them on all 18 rows while we wait for parts.

Hopefully they work. A lot of stuff happens in this 6 feet. Row cleaners  clear trash and residue out of the path. Then the starter fertilizer is placed 2Ē to the side and two inches below where the seed will be planted. Then the meter drops the seed in seed trench made by two seed disks. The depth of the trench is controlled by the gauge wheels. Then some nylon plastic ďseed formersĒ gently push the seed to bottom of trench and make sure seed has good soil contact. Then we spray  a 3 1/2 inch ďTee bandĒ
that goes in the trench and a inch to each side of it . We can use a very small amount of insecticide to protect our seeds from grubs, wire worms and seed corn maggots. We can cut our rate by 10x using the narrow Tee band. One problem with cover crops is that they are also a very good environment for harmful insects. Finally the closing wheels close the seed trench and light pack the ground to insure good seed to soil contact and consistent depth.

Bjrogg

PS I sure hope this is going to work. Iím a little nervous about switching them all without trying them out on one row first. We plant in a lot of different conditions and those conditions can have a huge effect on how something like this works
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #65 on: February 19, 2022, 08:50:21 am »
I also got that point haft to a river cane shaft

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline GlisGlis

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,319
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #66 on: February 22, 2022, 04:28:09 am »
Nice point. It deserve to fly  (SH)
did you use foreshaft or direct connection to rivercane?

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #67 on: February 24, 2022, 06:03:36 am »
Sorry itís been awhile. Glis glis. It is mounted directly to the river cane. Has  wild turkey tail feathers with a two fletch. Itís i. The arrow section . I called it pass thru.


Right now itís cold again and Iím spreading Biosolids.  Bouncing across field 2 mph in the dark

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #68 on: February 24, 2022, 08:08:27 am »
Three hours later and the sun is coming up. I could see about thirty just as the sun was breaking.
Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline Marc St Louis

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 7,803
  • Keep it flexible
    • Marc's Bows and Arrows
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #69 on: February 24, 2022, 09:18:53 am »
Sorry itís been awhile. Glis glis. It is mounted directly to the river cane. Has  wild turkey tail feathers with a two fletch. Itís i. The arrow section . I called it pass thru.


Right now itís cold again and Iím spreading Biosolids.  Bouncing across field 2 mph in the dark

Bjrogg

Any particular reason why you are doing that in the dark?
Home of heat-treating, Corbeil, On.  Canada

Marc@Ironwoodbowyer.com

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #70 on: February 24, 2022, 10:35:49 am »
 A couple Marc.

1 my schedule. Have a meeting this afternoon and tomorrow I have my great aunt funeral.

2 I like having the ground frozen enough I donít even leave a track.

3 going to take a few days and have to do it while conditions allow.

With the gps itís not a problem.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline Buckskinner

  • Member
  • Posts: 178
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #71 on: February 24, 2022, 11:13:00 am »
I grew up on a beef/hog operation but decided not to peruse it later in life, but still live on part of the property. My brother was born to be a farmer and not room for both of us anyway.  He gave it a go for about 20 years but could not find enough land to make it work.  Now he just hobby farms about 90 acres and I rent mine to the neighbors.  He's the last of 8 generations to farm the area, but who knows what his kids will do in future.

That is quite a conversion!  I remember my Dad back in the 70's converted a 4 to a 6 row corn planter, obviously that was nothing complicated as everything was mechanical and pretty simple.  These days with the electronics alone makes that a major undertaking.  I don't know a thing about raising sugar beet, but my brother put in radishes for cover crop last fall and the deer sure love them!  Actually I ate a pile of them as well, I'd pull one on my way to deer stand and munch on it.  Also they were great cooked!

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #72 on: February 25, 2022, 08:28:11 am »
Buckskinner I totally understand you and your brothers situation.

We grew up milking cows, making hay and hoeing weedy sugar beets. My dad was very good at letting us make mistakes and learning from them. Itís something Iím probably not as good at and mistakes have become very expensive.

My dad said we could always come back to the farm, but we had to leave it first and try something else. My dad was a smart man with a lot of common sense. I went to electronics school and after I worked in Detroit for several years. In the spring of 1984 the economy was terrible. Inflation was crazy and the place I worked at was going to have to let someone go. It was me or a guy with a wife and kids. I decided to pack up my meager belongings and go back to the farm.

It was difficult. Interest rates were high. Everything was expensive and when I left the farm they sold the cows. My next youngest brother had taken a job and work off the farm for a few years. Now he was getting married and wanted to come back to the farm. We decided to buy some cows and start milking again. I remember being very nervous about how much money I had to borrow and how high the interest rate was. My dad told me if you donít have anything, they canít take anything away from you. That was 38 years ago and I have been I debt ever since. It has been a struggle and the time I spent off the farm made me appreciate my time on the farm enough to stick with it. I have had to sell stuff I couldnít make the payments on. It hurt and my brother who farmed with me for 35 years decided it was time for him to leave the farm again. We had to sell land and there wasnít enough left for all of us.
Myself and my middle brother decided to keep trying to make it go. The next couple years were very difficult and very hard on one nerves. We somehow managed to survive them. I said a lot of prayers and asked the good lord to take care of us. Honestly he was the only one who could. He has and we are getting through it.


My dad planted our first sugar beet crop two days before I was born. This spring if my planter works I will plant our 61st crop of sugar beets. Things have certainly changed. Yet stayed the same. We still take those delicate little beets seeds and plant them in the cold moist soil. We still do a lot of praying and worrying.

Last year we had a record year for sugar beet yields. We averaged 44 tons per acre. A whole 10 tons higher than the fantastic crop we grew the year prior. Unfortunately the sugar content was very low. We averaged 16.4% sugar. The year prior we averaged 20.23% sugar. The previous year even though we had over 3,000 less tons. We had over 300,000 more lbs of sugar from them. This still wouldnít be so terrible except beet are a perishable crop. We canít just store them in a bin. They go on huge piles and we have to get them processed before the end of spring.

The most we have ever processed as a coop is 5.1 million tons. Last year we estimated we had a 5.8 million ton crop. We left 5% of our crop unharvested, knowing we would never be able to process it. Also knowing we probably should have left another 5 or 7 percent unharvested.

We harvested them though. Hoping for a record slice and hoping the factories could get them processed. We are still very short on employees at our factories with 80 open positions. Covid has made it difficult to keep the ones we have able to come to work with exposures and quarantine.
Instead of having record slice it has been pretty disappointing.  Now we are paying to haul beets away and dispose of them. I expect us to discard around a million tons of beets between what we didnít harvest and what we haul back from the piles. And the amount of sugar we get from the tons we do process is low. Normally we get between 290 to 320 lbs of sugar from a ton. We are averaging 239 lbs.
Kinda like when you have to much zucchini and canít find a home for it, but a lot more expensive.

We will do it again though and chances are with different results. Hardly ever have the same results two years in a row.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline Buckskinner

  • Member
  • Posts: 178
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #73 on: February 25, 2022, 10:36:17 am »
Most who don't grow up on a farm don't realize the cutting edge that farms run on, literally year to year where a lot of them you are just trying to pay for inputs and interest.  We also had extremely lean years where Dad wouldn't talk about it, but you could see it in his face every day.   I wouldn't have traded my childhood for anything, I learned 100x more working on the farm than I did in college, and the farm was the reason I got my first job which laid the foundation for my entire career.  My to be first boss saw on my resume that I grew up on a farm, asked me some questions only a farm kid would know and offered me the job on the spot.

I try to instill the same for my kids and even though they helped the neighbor milk and my brother put up hay and such, it's not the same as the grind of every day.  I do think they have a work ethic and can appreciate a hard day's work.  I remember a day about 8 years ago when their baseball practice was cancelled because it was too hot out and they spent the afternoon unloading hay, that's farm life though...

I learned a lot about the beet business just from your above post!  I wish you a prosperous growing season and with high sugar content and efficient processing!

Offline bjrogg

  • Member
  • Posts: 9,435
  • Cedar Pond
Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #74 on: February 26, 2022, 04:19:48 pm »
Stick around and you will learn a lot more about the sugar beets. They are pretty interesting crop to grow.

I got up at 3:00 am Thursday and applied Biosolids till 1:30pm. Then got cleaned up and went to a meeting from 3:00 pm till almost 8:00

Slept in a bit Friday and went to my aunts funeral. She was only a couple weeks from 97. Lived a good life and raised 13 kids. It was really good to see so many of my cousins again. Itís to bad someone always seems to have to pass for so many of us to.

I visited with my cousins till about 3:00 pm and then went back at applying Biosolids till 10:30pm

My wire harness came back. It did have a broken wire. My nephew installed it last night but couldnít get the hydraulic motors to turn. This morning I looked everything over and tried it. I got the motors to turn but the one we added was turning wrong direction. Iím hoping I can plumb it differently to change its direction. Iíll have to talk to Deere Monday.

This afternoon I got the bow I started last winter back out and did a little scraping. I got this stave from Arvin. Thanks Arvin Iím sorry itís taking me so long, but hopefully I can get it to the flats someday. September is a really busy time for me though.

It has a little reflex right out of the right fade. Makes it look a little worse than it is. I think I need a little more right outer third. Kinda like left limb so far. Iím not going to rush this one. Itís about 50@21
right now. It seems to have gained a little weight just sitting in my shop.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise