Author Topic: Life on the Farm  (Read 136989 times)

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Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #690 on: May 11, 2023, 06:35:32 am »
Still too wet to plant yet, but dry enough to spray.

I finished spraying the wheat. It needed it. Was very weedy.

Then I sprayed rye cover crop where we are going to plant soybeans. The rye is really growing and itís time to terminate it.

Then I started spraying sugar beets. They are still very small but the rye cover crop they were planted into is growing and needs to be terminated. It should provide good wind protection now even after it dies.

Bjrogg
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Offline GlisGlis

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #691 on: May 12, 2023, 02:31:08 am »
How do you terminate the rye? do you cut it and leave as mulch?

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #692 on: May 12, 2023, 06:08:18 am »
I hope I can reply now. I meant to post some pictures my last reply but either something changed on the site or my phone and I wasnít able to. It just showed my last reply in big print and no reply tab.

Where Iím going to plant soybeans yet I can either use tillage or herbicide . The tillage wonít completely kill it. It will slow it down a little and give the soybeans a chance until I can use herbicide later.

Where I used tillage previously to planting our sugar beets the rye I has grown back and it is completely taking over my sugar beets now. There I use herbicides. This is where modern methods work so well with old ones. This has always been one of the biggest challenges with using cover crops. They are very challenging to manage.

Normally I would have used tillage to knock the rye back before planting the soybeans but this rye is really growing fast now and itís going to be a week before I can plant. We decided to spray now instead of tillage. The rye is getting so big it will plug up and make piles behind our tillage tools if we donít.

Bjrogg

Hereís where the soybeans will go.  The rye has done its job. Itís scavenging nutrients, supporting microorganisms and protecting the soil from erosion while building organic matter. In a week or so hopefully it will be tilled and planted to soybeans and the residue will remain there to prevent wind and soil erosion.
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Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #693 on: May 12, 2023, 06:13:56 am »
Seems like I can post again

The next picture is of our beet fields. These fields were tilled before planting. The rye has done its job here too. After applying herbicide the rye will die and the dead plants will continue to protect against wind erosion.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #694 on: May 12, 2023, 06:20:29 am »
Here are the sugar beet plants. At this time they are still very small. Slow growing and susceptible to many things one being cut off by wind and dirt blowing. The old crop residue and rye residue ( we call it trash) will help protect them. They canít compete with the living rye anymore though

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #695 on: May 12, 2023, 06:23:05 am »
Hereís another picture for Bob

Bjrogg
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Offline GlisGlis

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #696 on: May 12, 2023, 06:29:15 am »
Are herbicides so specific that they kill rye and dont adversely affect soybeens or beet growth?
Sorry if my questions are so basic but I have big lack of knowledge and I find this thread really interesting

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #697 on: May 12, 2023, 06:56:17 am »
Good question Glis.

This is really where modern technology make these cover crops work.

In the past this was a huge problem. We had to use tillage to terminate the rye. A lot of it. The rye still didnít completely die and became a weed. If we did enough tillage to kill it, there was no (trash ) left for wind protection.

Modern (hereís that bad word GMOís) have allowed us to plant right into growing cover crops and then spray them. Killing the cover and leaving its trash on top to still give protection from the wind.

Iím not against GMOís . They are very beneficial. They have many different types.

Some allow the crop to be resistant to a chemical. Some allow the crop to be resistant to a bug making it so we donít have to use an insecticide.

Some protect crop from disease and allow us to not have to spray a fungicide.

I really believe they are good for the environment and have prevented literally tons chemicals from being used.

Bjrogg
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Offline chamookman

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #698 on: May 13, 2023, 03:23:50 am »
Thanks BJ ! Was She in that close, or is it just the Pic ? Bob
"May the Gods give Us the strength to draw the string to the cheek, the arrow to the barb and loose the flying shaft, so long as life may last." Saxon Pope - 1923.

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #699 on: May 13, 2023, 05:49:14 am »
Thanks BJ ! Was She in that close, or is it just the Pic ? Bob


I would say she was in pretty close.

It always looks closer looking from my field than from the beach. She looks pretty close though.

Bjrogg
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Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #700 on: May 13, 2023, 05:58:43 am »
Hopefully start planting my sons corn today. I got some more stuff ready for planting yesterday then looked for asparagus. It was just starting to come up. Made a great Motherís Day gift for my wife. I have picked her wild flowers before and she said they were stinky and threw them out. She never complains about the asparagus and she never throws it out. We both love it.

Bjrogg
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Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #701 on: May 13, 2023, 06:01:56 am »
Then my youngest son and I worked at firewood and burning our brush pile. Might be last chance we get to work at it this spring and I was glad to get to mess cleaned up before the grass got tall.

Bjrogg
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Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #702 on: May 13, 2023, 06:03:14 am »
By dark it was all burnt up.
Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise

Offline M2A

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #703 on: May 13, 2023, 06:18:30 am »
Good to see your beets are up. Heck of a nice looking stand of rye, trash from that ought to serve you well.

Next week looks like some good weather here for things to start growing well. Tomatoes and peppers just about ready to be transplanted and strawberries started blooming this week.
Mike   

Offline bjrogg

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Re: Life on the Farm
« Reply #704 on: May 15, 2023, 07:10:34 am »
Thanks Mike hope you have a great growing season too.

I started planting my sons corn Saturday. Planted his field to the south where it didnít rain as much. Then a couple small ones around his barn . The rest of his fields werenít quite dry enough and we took yesterday Motherís Day.

Hopefully we can plant some more today. We actually had a white frost this morning. Was hoping we were done with those . Might get my apple blossoms.

Bjrogg
A hot cup of coffee and a beautiful sunrise